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Beauregard & Bassac Town HallVersion Française
 
     
   

In the 13th century, Edward I of England bestowed on Beauregard the status of bastide (which the charters of the era designated as « Bastide Belli Gardi »). Around 1268, Edward built a castle there which was owned by a succession of families and which suffered severe damage in various battles. The bastide was never rebuilt after the Wars of Religion.

Bassac owes its name to the BASSAS
family (who had their country seat there).

     
   

Bassac and Beauregard doubtless joined forces to become one village in the aftermath of the Revolution in an attempt to settle the quarrels and problems arisen during this period between the two « towns ».

The famous cartographer Pierre de Belleyme, was born at Bassac on 14th March 1747.

 

Toponymy (origins of the commune’s place names)

Beauregard : Called Belregard in 1289. The name originates in its geographical position, meaning « Belle Vue » or beautiful view and was very often the name given to a manor house.

Bassac : Called Bacaicum in 852. The Latin word was originally a man’s name, Bassius or Baccuis.

La Cabane : the name comes from the Latin ‘Capanna’ meaning cabin. Its origins date back to prehistoric times.

Le Perrier :
Comes from the Latin ‘Petra’ meaning stone (‘pierre’) or rock or mountain. The word can also refer to ancient ruins.

Baneuil : Called Baniolum or Baigneuse in the 13th century which comes from the combined name of a Germanic person, ‘Banné’ which means field and the Gaulish ‘lalo’ meaning clearing.

Les Mazeaux : owes its name to leprosy. In Arabic ‘mézorra’ means leper. The afflicted were known as the « Mézeaux ».

La Souille : a man’s name - either the Gaulish ‘Sollius’ or the Latin ‘Solius’.

Beauregard et Bassac is situated in the canton of Villamblard and is reached by the D38, 4km from the St Mamet Bridge (RN21). It has a surface area of 1182 ha and a population of 277 (official population on January 1, 2017).



Text translated by Pays du Grand Bergeracois (professional translator).